Ice caving adventure mentioned in The Guardian

Our recent ice caving expedition to the Greenland Ice Sheet was featured briefly in The Guardian this week. More info on this trip coming soon!

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2017/oct/22/the-eco-guide-to-the-new-mindful-activism

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Greenland Aurora

Camping on the ice sheet in September/October was a new experience – I’d never seen darkness on the ice before! The lack of light pollution and cloud-free skies made for a truly spectacular display of the Northern Lights. It was -25C and 35 knot winds pretty much constantly, so it was a constant battle between wanting to get into a tent and warm up and not wanting to miss a second of watching the aurora dancing over the milky way, with passing satellites and the occasional shooting star.

While on a personal level this was an incredible treat, it also presented some pretty major challenges for working with drones on the ice. The aurora knocked out the radio communications linking our drones to their controllers, meaning they could only be controlled over local wifi, reducing their range from a few hundred metres to about 30!

Inspired by a recent twitter exchange about this I bought Melanie Windridge’s book “Aurora” & thoroughly recommend it!

EGU Image of the Week: Algal blooms on GrIS

A short article I wrote for the EGU blog about biological darkening of ice and snow was posted last month. The article was built around an aerial view of our 2016 field camp on the Greenland Ice Sheet, where large areas of dark ice are clearly visible.

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Aerial view of the field camp in July 2016

The dark colour is due to a collection of dusts, soot and algal cells, with the algal cells doing the bulk of the darkening. A second figure in the article shows the algal cells under the microscope along with the spectra of reflected light from the algal ice surfaces. This was one of several EGU blog posts about icy biology, including this one and this one!

Nouvelles Explorations Festival, Royan

Arriving in balmy Royan (France) straight from a frosty ice camp in Greenland was a welcome shock to the system. The small seaside town was home to a five day celebration of geographical and intellectual exploration – the Festival des Nouvelles Explorations. I had the pleasure of talking about icy science on Thursday afternoon and discovering some truly amazing work being done in the fields of virtual reality, art-science fusion, cyber-security, drone technology and conservation. Three short videos below explain some of the work on show at the festival.

 

New spec-tech! A smartphone-based UV spectrometer

In our new paper we report on some novel tech that uses the sensor in a smartphone for ultraviolet spectroscopy. It is low cost and based entirely on off-the-shelf components plus a 3-D printed case. The system was designed with volcanology in mind – specifically the detection of atmospheric sulphur dioxide, but may also have applications for supraglacial spectroscopy. As far as we know this is the first nanometer resolution UV spectrometer based on smartphone sensor technology and the framework can be easily adapted to cover other wavelengths.

This follows on from a Raspberry-Pi based UV camera reported in Sensors last year which was recently adapted to sense in the visible and near-infra-red wavelengths for use on ice. The plan now is to compare the images from the Pi-cam system to those made using an off-the-shelf multispectral imaging camera that detects the same wavelengths. A report of testing this camera system for detecting volcanic gases is available at Tom Pering’s blog here.

Raspberry-Pi and smartphone based spectroscopy could make obtaining high-spectral resolution data a real possibility for hobbyists and scientists lacking sufficient funds to purchase an expensive field spectrometer. The system is also small and light and therefore more convenient for some field applications than the heavy and cumbersome field specs available commercially and can easily be mounted to a UAV.