EGU Image of the Week: Algal blooms on GrIS

A short article I wrote for the EGU blog about biological darkening of ice and snow was posted last month. The article was built around an aerial view of our 2016 field camp on the Greenland Ice Sheet, where large areas of dark ice are clearly visible.

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Aerial view of the field camp in July 2016

The dark colour is due to a collection of dusts, soot and algal cells, with the algal cells doing the bulk of the darkening. A second figure in the article shows the algal cells under the microscope along with the spectra of reflected light from the algal ice surfaces. This was one of several EGU blog posts about icy biology, including this one and this one!

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Nouvelles Explorations Festival, Royan

Arriving in balmy Royan (France) straight from a frosty ice camp in Greenland was a welcome shock to the system. The small seaside town was home to a five day celebration of geographical and intellectual exploration – the Festival des Nouvelles Explorations. I had the pleasure of talking about icy science on Thursday afternoon and discovering some truly amazing work being done in the fields of virtual reality, art-science fusion, cyber-security, drone technology and conservation. Three short videos below explain some of the work on show at the festival.

 

On the ice with the BBC

The BBC Science team joined us for our first twenty-four hours on the ice this year, documented our work on algal darkening of the Greenland Ice Sheet. This started in the dusty town of Kangerlussuaq, where I took David Shukman, Kate Stephens and Jonathon Sumberg out to Russell Glacier. There, while I flew the drone to get aerial shots for the news broadcasts, the team did their ‘to camera’ pieces and filmed the melt pouring off out out of the glacier’s calving front. Here’s one of the short UAV clips showing the dramatic front of Russell.

The next morning it was onto the ice. We worked as quickly as possible to get a camp established, including the mess tent, personal tents, equipment cage and toilet. The BBC team filmed their on location pieces and Andrew and I flew the various UAVs and set up the science kit to demonstrate the measurements we’d be taking after the film team were gone. We all gave our interviews which were used for the 6 O’clock and 10 O’clock Evening News, the Morning News, Radio 4 and BBC On Demand. I also recorded a more light-hearted interview about living on the ice sheet which is linked to in the online news article.

Here’s the online article: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-40686984

and the Radio 4 show: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-40686984

The next morning the team packed up and shipped out back to dry land, leaving four of us (me, Andrew Tedstone, Stefan Hofer and Tom Gribbin) on the ice to start making our measurements of surface reflectance and algal growth. The picture below shows our camp from the air, looking roughly west.

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One of our team, Tom Gribbin, also made this short film about the season using his GoPro camera.

Weston Park Museum: Everyday Wonders

The Western Park Museum recently got in touch to talk about their excellent Arctic World exhibition. I know the museum well as it is a two-minute stroll across the park from my office in Sheffield, so I was really pleased to offer some thoughts. The idea was to produce a new book (‘Everyday Wonders: 50 objects from Weston Park Museum’) that gives a whistle-stop journey through the museum, stopping by at 50 of the most iconic and interesting artifacts on display. I was asked to comment on Snowy, the polar bear – the centre-piece of the Arctic World exhibition. A photo of my contribution to the book is below, but I encourage anyone who is interested to visit the museum and perhaps purchase a copy for themselves.

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The Musueum can be found at:

@MuseumsSheffield

http://www.museums-sheffield.org.uk/

Video: Alive and Well: Microbes Add to Melting of Greenland Ice Sheet

Peter Sinclair and Yale Climate Connections have released an excellent video detailing the role of microbial life in driving Greenland Ice Sheet melt, featuring several researchers from the Dark Snow Project and Black and Bloom. We were lucky enough to have Peter with us for a couple of days at the beginning of our trip in 2016.

Cryoconite, ice algae and melt on NewsTalk

Yesterday I chatted to Moncrieff on Newstalk about cryoconite, ice algae and the melting Arctic ice. The link to listen back is available here (24th January, Moncreiff show, Part 1):

https://t.co/BgXxs7FNxx

I was also stunned by the beautiful images of Greenland released by Timo Lieber this week and covered by several media outlets – here’s an example and a link to their FB page.